WINE AND LIQUEUR TYPES
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WHITE TO BROWN AFTER-DINNER SWEET
Here a wide range of colours is acceptable, with the deeper colours usually providing the best wines, but there must be no red colouring.
Except for colour and acidity (which can range from 0.5% to 0.9%) other characteristics are usually as for Red After-Dinner Wine, Sweet.
Commercial examples of fortified types are some Muscat wines, Madeira wines, and the sweet oloroso sherries.


RED AFTER-DINNER SWEET
The colour should be deep. Mature wines may have tawny characteristics but should display some red colour.
The flavour should be rich, fruity and vinous, the whole being mellow and mature. Acidity should be between 0.45% and 0.7%. The alcohol content should be from at least 14% to as high as may be achieved by fermentation, with higher levels allowable only if the schedule permits fortification.
The wine should be as sweet as the other characteristics will permit without becoming cloying. Although this wine is often called ‘Dessert’, it is meant for drinking after dinner.
Commercial examples for an unfortified class are the Greek Mavrodaphne of Patras (15% alcohol) or the sweeter versions of the Italian Recioto della Valpolicella, with Port (19-22% alcohol) for a fortified class. Some Tawny Ports are too light in colour to be ideal examples of after-dinner red sweet wine.


Last updated: 03/12/09
Copyright: 2006 NGWBJ